IWAI - Dublin Branch

IWAI - Dublin Branch - Proposals for the Liffey, Grand Canal and Royal Canal

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March 2008: Here's a plan for a new island.  A U-shaped canal is proposed and  a line of buildings on stilts protruding into the line of the existing Liffey.  There's a lot more besides - see here.
March 2008: Here's a plan for a new island.  A U-shaped canal is proposed and  a line of buildings on stilts protruding into the line of the existing Liffey.  There's a lot more besides - see here.
This daft picture appeared in Metro, Feb 6th 2008.  The artist needs to lower the bed another 15ft or so and omitted the usual bicycles, traffic cones, shopping trolleys etc.
Jan 16th, 2008 saw a number of news reports relating to bring life to the Liffey by reintroducing Guinness Barges.  
The plan is costed at ?8 or ?18m (reports differ) and includes plans to build a 120m pontoon at Ormond Quay.  This floating street will have a restaurant and bar on it and will also be the meeting point for a new river cruise and taxi service. 
 The plan is to refurbish four Guinness Barges, currently in Lough Neagh, the Killiney, Clonsilla, Foyle and Vartry - The Clonsilla sank in 1976 under 100ft of water. A scuba team has identified the wreckage and we hope to recover her in the new year. The other barges were beached and filled with rocks so that they wouldn?t run adrift..
Quoting from the Sunday Times of Oct 29, 2006, ?The Guinness barges were a symbol of Dublin for almost 100 years and are an important part of our rich maritime history,? said Sam Corbett of the Irish Ship & Barge Fabrication Company. ?We?re salvaging the vessels at a cost of ?1m each and plan a regular service between Victoria Quay, Ormond Quay and Grand Canal Dock. We have support from Guinness, Dublin city council and the Dublin Port company. 
Once restored, two of the boats will be fitted with modern motors, while the others will have steam engines. The largest, the Killiney, will have a timber and brass interior reminiscent of the 1920s, while the others will be designed in modern, art deco and Georgian style.
According to a report in the Irish Times (Jan 15, 2008) 
The refitted, glass-canopied barges would operate two- and four-hour cruises, while a separate fleet of ferries would collect and drop off passengers at 12 points along the river, including Smithfield, Tara Street, the Point, Grand Canal Dock and the planned U2 Experience in the Docklands.

Photo is courtesy of Irish Ship and Barge Fabrication
  North_Lotts_Proposed_Plan_Feb08  
  North_Lotts_Proposed_Plan_Feb08_detail  
  dry_liffey  
  `Guinness-barge_pontoon_2  
Jan 16th, 2008 saw a number of news reports relating to bring life to the Liffey by reintroducing Guinness Barges.  
The plan is costed at ?8 or ?18m (reports differ) and includes plans to build a 120m pontoon at Ormond Quay.  This floating street will have a restaurant and bar on it and will also be the meeting point for a new river cruise and taxi service. 
 The plan is to refurbish four Guinness Barges, currently in Lough Neagh, the Killiney, Clonsilla, Foyle and Vartry - The Clonsilla sank in 1976 under 100ft of water. A scuba team has identified the wreckage and we hope to recover her in the new year. The other barges were beached and filled with rocks so that they wouldn?t run adrift..
Quoting from the Sunday Times of Oct 29, 2006, ?The Guinness barges were a symbol of Dublin for almost 100 years and are an important part of our rich maritime history,? said Sam Corbett of the Irish Ship & Barge Fabrication Company. ?We?re salvaging the vessels at a cost of ?1m each and plan a regular service between Victoria Quay, Ormond Quay and Grand Canal Dock. We have support from Guinness, Dublin city council and the Dublin Port company. 
Once restored, two of the boats will be fitted with modern motors, while the others will have steam engines. The largest, the Killiney, will have a timber and brass interior reminiscent of the 1920s, while the others will be designed in modern, art deco and Georgian style.
According to a report in the Irish Times (Jan 15, 2008) 
The refitted, glass-canopied barges would operate two- and four-hour cruises, while a separate fleet of ferries would collect and drop off passengers at 12 points along the river, including Smithfield, Tara Street, the Point, Grand Canal Dock and the planned U2 Experience in the Docklands.

Photo is from Archiseek
Jan 16th, 2008 saw a number of news reports relating to bring life to the Liffey by reintroducing Guinness Barges.  
The plan is costed at ?8 or ?18m (reports differ) and includes plans to build a 120m pontoon at Ormond Quay.  This floating street will have a restaurant and bar on it and will also be the meeting point for a new river cruise and taxi service. 
 The plan is to refurbish four Guinness Barges, currently in Lough Neagh, the Killiney, Clonsilla, Foyle and Vartry - The Clonsilla sank in 1976 under 100ft of water. A scuba team has identified the wreckage and we hope to recover her in the new year. The other barges were beached and filled with rocks so that they wouldn?t run adrift..
Quoting from the Sunday Times of Oct 29, 2006, ?The Guinness barges were a symbol of Dublin for almost 100 years and are an important part of our rich maritime history,? said Sam Corbett of the Irish Ship & Barge Fabrication Company. ?We?re salvaging the vessels at a cost of ?1m each and plan a regular service between Victoria Quay, Ormond Quay and Grand Canal Dock. We have support from Guinness, Dublin city council and the Dublin Port company. 
Once restored, two of the boats will be fitted with modern motors, while the others will have steam engines. The largest, the Killiney, will have a timber and brass interior reminiscent of the 1920s, while the others will be designed in modern, art deco and Georgian style.
According to a report in the Irish Times (Jan 15, 2008) 
The refitted, glass-canopied barges would operate two- and four-hour cruises, while a separate fleet of ferries would collect and drop off passengers at 12 points along the river, including Smithfield, Tara Street, the Point, Grand Canal Dock and the planned U2 Experience in the Docklands.

Photo is courtesy of Irish Ship and Barge Fabrication
August 2007: Sculptor Antony Gormley released this mock-up of his proposed 48-metre high Dublin Docklands sculpture.    The artist was selected from a shortlist of six after an international competition for the landmark public art project for the docklands.  Costing an estimated ?1.6 million, the sculpture is likely to be located in the river Liffey close to the Seán O'Casey footbridge, pending planning permission.

The London-born artist is perhaps most famous for his Angel of the North, a massive sculpture that put Newcastle on the international artistic map.  According to the DDDA, the work will be a signpost for the realignment of Dublin's epicentre eastwards. The sculpture will read as a drawing against the changing light of the sky, within an area of Dublin that has low-rise buildings on both sides of the river.

Mr Gormley has evolved this proposal from Field, a vast installation of 35,000 sculptures last seen in Dublin in 1993 at his show in Imma, where tiny individual clay objects looked up at the viewer.  This dynamic has been reversed in this proposal for Dublin, where the pedestrians on the street will be Lilliputians relative to the sculpture.

The docklands authority will apply for planning permission at the end of the 2007 and, if successful, construction will begin in 2008 and take about eight months to complete.

It has been pointed out that from this angle, he (and it appears to be a he) appears to be urinating!
August 2007:  The Liffey Cable Car Company was among 53 applicants who sought permission from An Bord Pleanala to build a range of large projects under a new system allowing Strategic Infrastructure Development applications to be processed more quickly.

In November 2007, An Bord Pleanala ruled that it did  not qualify as strategic infrastructure and must thus go through the nurmal planning process.

The cable car - known as Suas - would run between Heuston Station and the Docklands and would transport sightseers at heights close to 80 metres above the river from the Guinness Brewery near Heuston to a terminal near the planned national conference centre at Spencer Dock.  It  is designed more as a tourist attraction than for public transport.
  guinnness barge pontoon  
  `Guinness-barge_pontoon_3  
  Antony_Gormley_Liffey_Colossus  
  Suas-Liffey_Cable_Car  
Dublin Corporation commissioned Santiago Calatrava Valla, the world's leading bridge designer, to design a new Liffey crossing at Macken Street - halfway between the Matt Talbot bridge and the East Link bridge. The brief called for a landmark structure of unmistakable modernity and with a unique character that would provide a symbol at the maritime gateway of Dublin, similar to the manner in which the Ha'penny Bridge has become an icon for the city.  

The bridge is cable stayed with a curved inclined steel pylon. The bridge shall be capable of opening by way of a rotation mechanism housed in the base of the pylon.
(From June 2007)The Samuel Beckett Bridge (Macken St bridge) will be constructed by Graham Hollandia Joint Venture. The total cost of the project is estimated at ?47 million, which will also include a major upgrade of the approach roads. The bridge will have four traffic lanes with cycle tracks and footpaths on either side of the bridge, while being capable of opening to accommodate maritime traffic. The bridge is expected to be completed by 2009.  
See also our news page for updates on construction.
In 2002, the DDDA ran a competition for a pedesrian bridge over the Liffey.  The winning design, built in 2005 is now the Sean O'Casey bridge.  This losing design is from Mary Laheen Architects.

What a  Pity it wasn't built!  This bridge featured a fascinating opening mechanism.

The opening section at the centre was 40 metres in length. Essentially, the opening section of the deck has slung beneath it four tanks carrying 17000 litres of water. These are full when the deck is down and then as the deck rises the water is released appearing like a waterfall beneath the arches. To raise the deck the arches move apart and the steel ropes pull the deck upwards to leave room for ships to pass beneath.

The weight of the arches is balanced by the weight of the deck and water. Releasing the water lightens the deck and allows the arches to spread and the deck to rise.  The tanks are rotated to release water. The rotation causes a sheet of water to spill out over the edge of the tank until it has completed its 180 deg. rotation and the opening slit is now facing downward toward the river. To close the bridge, the tanks are rotated through a further 180 deg until the opening slit is again upright and under the deck. Filtered water from the river is now pumped into the 4 tanks simultaneously. As this occurs the deck moves downward to the closed position.

When the bridge is in the open position the air draught is 23.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Spring Tide, and 20.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Neap Tide. When the bridge is closed the distance between the soffit level of the deck and the water is 6.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Spring Tide and 3.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Neap Tide. At worst condition ( Mean High Water Mark Spring Tide) the distance is 1.6 metres approx.

The photo montage is copyright Ros Kavanagh.
More information is here
In 2002, the DDDA ran a competition for a pedesrian bridge over the Liffey.  The winning design is now the Sean O'Casey bridge.  This losing design is from Mary Laheen Architects.

What a  Pity it wasn't built!  This bridge featured a fascinating opening mechanism.

The opening section at the centre was 40 metres in length. Essentially, the opening section of the deck has slung beneath it four tanks carrying 17000 litres of water. These are full when the deck is down and then as the deck rises the water is released appearing like a waterfall beneath the arches. To raise the deck the arches move apart and the steel ropes pull the deck upwards to leave room for ships to pass beneath.

The weight of the arches is balanced by the weight of the deck and water. Releasing the water lightens the deck and allows the arches to spread and the deck to rise.  The tanks are rotated to release water. The rotation causes a sheet of water to spill out over the edge of the tank until it has completed its 180 deg. rotation and the opening slit is now facing downward toward the river. To close the bridge, the tanks are rotated through a further 180 deg until the opening slit is again upright and under the deck. Filtered water from the river is now pumped into the 4 tanks simultaneously. As this occurs the deck moves downward to the closed position.

When the bridge is in the open position the air draught is 23.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Spring Tide, and 20.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Neap Tide. When the bridge is closed the distance between the soffit level of the deck and the water is 6.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Spring Tide and 3.5 metres at Mean Low Water Mark Neap Tide. At worst condition ( Mean High Water Mark Spring Tide) the distance is 1.6 metres approx.

The photo montage is copyright Ros Kavanagh.
More information is here
In 2002, the DDDA ran a competition for a pedesrian bridge over the Liffey.  The winning design, built in 2005 is now the Sean O'Casey bridge.  This design from ABK Architects came second.
  Samuel Beckett_Bridge  
  Proposal_Mary_Laheen_Arch1  
  Proposal_Mary_Laheen_Arch2  
  Proposal_ABK_1  
In 2002, the DDDA ran a competition for a pedesrian bridge over the Liffey.  The winning design, built in 2005 is now the Sean O'Casey bridge.  This losing design is from Van Wylick
In 2002, the DDDA ran a competition for a pedesrian bridge over the Liffey.  The winning design, built in 2005 is now the Sean O'Casey bridge.   This design was from Newenham Mulligan and Associates.
In October 2007, an alternative design for the U2 tower by Foster & Partners was announced.  The Dublin Docklands Development Authority announced that Geranger Ltd, a consortium consisting of Ballymore Properties, Patrick McKillen and August Partners (U2 Band members and management) had been selected as the provisional preferred bidder to design, construct and finance the U2 Tower and Britain Quay Building.
In October 2007, an alternative design for the U2 tower by Foster & Partners was announced.  The Dublin Docklands Development Authority announced that Geranger Ltd, a consortium consisting of Ballymore Properties, Patrick McKillen and August Partners (U2 Band members and management) had been selected as the provisional preferred bidder to design, construct and finance the U2 Tower and Britain Quay Building.
  Proposal_Van_Wylick  
  Proposal_NMA  
  U2_Tower_Foster_1  
  U2_Tower_Foster_1a  
In October 2007, an alternative design for the U2 tower by Foster & Partners was announced.  The Dublin Docklands Development Authority announced that Geranger Ltd, a consortium consisting of Ballymore Properties, Patrick McKillen and August Partners (U2 Band members and management) had been selected as the provisional preferred bidder to design, construct and finance the U2 Tower and Britain Quay Building.
This was the winning design in 2003 for the U2 tower at Briton Quay, where the Grand Canal meets the Liffey. Burdon Dunne Architects / Craig Henry Architects designed.  

You can see the other competition entrants here
This was the winning design in 2003 for the U2 tower at Briton Quay, where the Grand Canal meets the Liffey. Burdon Dunne Architects / Craig Henry Architects designed.  

You can see the other competition entrants here
This was a losing design in 2003 for the U2 tower at Briton Quay, where the Grand Canal meets the Liffey.  

This was one of the more unusual designs - intendented to be a Colossus, but perhaps ending up like a lego monkey humping a table leg.  I like it.

You can see the other competition entrants here
  U2_Tower_Foster_2  
  U2_Tower_V1  
  U2_Tower_V1a  
  U2_Tower_De_Matos_Storey_Ryan1  
Welcome to the (small) section dedicated to what's been proposed in various fora for the Liffey' -
More links are welcome. Submit ideas to: , together with photographer's name, location featured and any other relevant information. If you recognise your (unattributed) photo on this gallery, please let us know so that we can properly credit it.
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